News Briefs

October 1, 2014 - 5:14pm

ORLANDO—An automated tablet-based test taken by patients to assess for major depressive disorder may be a valid and reliable tool to diagnose and track depression in adults, according to research presented at the 27th Annual U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress.

October 1, 2014 - 11:07am

Previously thought to take weeks, changes in brain connectivity induced by SSRIs actually start within hours after taking the antidepressant, researchers reported.

October 1, 2014 - 8:49am

Wearable brain scanners and lasers that can turn hundreds of cells on and off were among 58 projects awarded $46 million in federal grants as part of President Obama's $100 million initiative to unlock the secrets of the human brain.

September 30, 2014 - 2:43pm

Genetically determined taste perceptions could lead some people to become teetotalers and others to become alcoholics, a new study suggests.

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Blogs

Tue
30
Sep

The biblical proverb ‘Physician, heal thyself’ is interpreted literally by some psychiatrists who reach for pharmaceutical samples if they find themselves slipping into a depression.

Wed
03
Sep

Recently, two landmark studies have shown conclusively that genes play a definite role in the risk for major mental illness. I suggest that these studies are game changers for psychiatry not because they demonstrate the primacy of genes, but because the genes that most powerfully increase the risk for schizophrenia and autism point straight back to the environment.

Thu
28
Aug
Marc Agronin, MD

Trauma Revisited in Late Life

Although we often assume that the impact of trauma manifests right away, sometimes it can manifest decades later. This phenomenon was commonly seen in many World War II veterans who first began to experience PTSD symptoms around the time of fiftieth anniversary commemorations of the war in the mid-1990s.

Thu
21
Aug

I have a common kind of patient in my practice—he is somewhere in his late teens or early twenties, usually living at home, maybe taking a class or two at the community college, more often working but certainly not able to support himself without the help of his parents. His hobbies are often solitary, like video games. And he’s using a lot of cannabis.

Spotlight

Psych Congress 2014 Meeting Coverage

Psych Congress Network will be bringing you live, exclusive coverage of the 27th Annual U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress in Orlando, Florida. Visit the U.S. Psych Congress Resource Center for the latest news and video.

Exclusives

New Clues to the Neurobiology of Depression

To fully understand the neurobiology of major depression, mental health professionals must adopt a perspective that considers interactions between the brain, the outside world, and the body, including the immune system.

Wed
01
Oct

Exercise to Treat Depression, Backed by Biology

“Evidence shows that exercise changes brain structure and affects neurotransmitters, inflammation, and the autonomic nervous system. Exercise may have one of the widest ranges of effects that we see with any treatment,” said Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH, in a presentation at the 27th Annual U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress.

Wed
01
Oct

Electronic Test Reliably Assesses for Depression, Research Suggests

ORLANDO—An automated tablet-based test taken by patients to assess for major depressive disorder may be a valid and reliable tool to diagnose and track depression in adults, according to research presented at the 27th Annual U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress.

Wed
01
Oct

Ketamine: A Quick Guide to Receptors

David E. Nichols, PhD, talks with Charles Raison, MD, about how ketamine works at the receptor level to produce powerful and rapid antidepressant effects. Click through to watch the video and read a transcript.

Wed
01
Oct

Single SSRI Dose Changes Brain Architecture

Previously thought to take weeks, changes in brain connectivity induced by SSRIs actually start within hours after taking the antidepressant, researchers reported.