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Psych Congress  

Effectiveness of NeuroStar Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder with Postpartum Onset

Authors  
David Brock, MD
Pashia Groom, PhD
Richard Holbert, MD
Jeffrey Rado, MD
Paul Gross, MD
John Goethe, MD
G. Randolph Schrodt, MD
Howard Weeks, MD
Mark Demitrack, MD
Sponsor  
Neuronetics, Inc.

This poster was presented at the 29th Annual U.S. Psychiatric & Mental Health Congress, held October 21-24, 2016, in San Antonio, Texas. ​

Background: Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 10-15% of post-partum women. Although pharmacotherapy is a frequently recommended treatment option, patient acceptance is often limited by maternal concerns. Preliminary evidence has shown promise for the use of TMS in patients with PPD.

Methods: Medication-free outpatients with unipolar non-psychotic MDD with postpartum onset, with at least moderate symptom severity were enrolled (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)>9).  Onset of current illness began during the third trimester through 6 months following live childbirth, and patients were enrolled within 9 months post childbirth. Treatment ranged from 4 weeks to 8 weeks of daily left prefrontal NeuroStar TMS. The primary outcome was the change in depressive symptomatology assessed using the EPDS total scores with remission as a major secondary outcome measure.

Results: Nineteen patients were included in the final analysis.  The EPDS mean baseline score was 20.6 (SD-4.15) with the mean End of Acute score 8.2 (SD-6.50). Fourteen patients achieved remission of symptoms (EPDS<10) by the end of 8 weeks of TMS therapy. There were no serious adverse events.

Conclusions: NeuroStar TMS is effective as a monotherapy option for the treatment of women with MDD with post-partum onset. A total of 73.7% (14/19) of patients achieved remission of their depressive symptoms with acute treatment.  These data suggest that NeuroStar TMS Therapy is a promising non-pharmacologic treatment alternative for this patient population.

This study was funded by Neuronetics, Inc. www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT01842542.

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