ADHD

Children exposed to valproate in utero had a 48% increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), compared with children with no exposure to the drug, according to a new study.

Articles

For people who have trouble concentrating, help may be on the way through a new game app that helps improve the ability to focus just by playing.

Children exposed to valproate in utero had a 48% increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), compared with children with no exposure to the drug, according to a new study.

High-dose antipsychotic use in children and young adults without psychosis is associated with an increased risk of unexpected death, according to a study published online in JAMA Psychiatry.

A nationwide study in Denmark suggests a link between infections in childhood and adolescence and increased risk of subsequent mental disorders.

Children who have an older brother or sister with autism or ADHD may be more likely to develop these conditions than kids who don't have an older sibling with these neurological problems, a new study suggests.

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Blogs

Clinical pearls from the Psych Congress annual meeting.

Although the diagnostic criteria for the two conditions seem distinctive at first glance, there is a significant degree of variability of symptom presentation.

Question:

"As a busy practitioner, I am seeing more and more patients saying, ‘I have adult ADHD.' I don't want to over-diagnose adult ADHD, but I also don't want to miss it if it's really present. What is the best way for me to approach these patients?"

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Slideshows

Get expert insight on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, major depressive disorder, and addiction, gleaned from presentations at the 2018 Elevate by Psych Congress conference.

Posters

Lenard Adler, MD; Stephen Faraone, PhD; Phillip Sarocco, RPh, MSc; Norman Atkins, PhD, MBA; Alexandra Khachatryan, MPH
Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH; Greg Mattingly, MD; Andrei Pikalov, MD, PhD; Quentin OкBrien, MPH; Jacquelin Scully, MPH; Alexandria Smith, BS; Danielle Sender, MS; Keenan OкBrien, NA; Jani Hegarty, BA
Thomas Brown, PhD; Emuella Flood, BA; Phil Sarocco, BPharm, MSc; Norman Atkins, Jr., MBA, PhD; Alexandra Khachatryan, MPH
Lenard Adler, MD; Stephen Faraone, PhD; Phillip Sarocco, RPh, MSc; Norman Atkins, PhD, MBA; Alexandra Khachatryan, MPH
Andrew J. Cutler, MD; W. Edward Martucci, PhD; Jeffrey D. Bower, PhD; Scott Kellogg; Stephen V. Faraone, PhD; Joanne L. Northcutt, PhD; Naomi O. Davis, PhD; Scott H. Kollins, PhD

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Video

Julie Carbray, PhD, FPMHNP-BC, PMHCNS-BC, APRN, discusses why bipolar disorder is often misdiagnosed, differentiating bipolar disorder from depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and signs of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder.

Charles Raison, MD, comments on a recent Lancet study detailing how five major psychiatric disorders—autism, ADHD, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia—are genetically connected.

Timothy Wilens, MD, and Charles Raison, MD, discuss how clinicians can distinguish bipolar disorder from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. They also explore which therapies might be appropriate.

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