Sleep Disorders

Having post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression treated with antidepressants, or mental illness in general is linked with an increased risk of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published online in Neurology.

Articles

Having post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression treated with antidepressants, or mental illness in general is linked with an increased risk of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published online in Neurology.

In abstinence-motivated people with opioid dependence, symptoms of anxiety, depression or insomnia should not prevent switching from an opioid agonist to extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), researchers in Norway say.

One third of U.S. adults say they sleep less than six hours a night, which is 15 percent more than were getting too little sleep 15 years ago, researchers say.

Alcohol use and psychological distress are newly identified risk factors for possible REM-sleep-behavior disorder (pRBD), according to findings from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA).

Soldiers who have insomnia before deployment may be more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or experience suicidal thoughts than service members who don't have insomnia before they deploy, a U.S. study suggests.

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Blogs

How aggressive are you in treating insomnia in your patients, and how do you choose which agent to use?

Sleep apnea is one of the most common and most important sleep disorders in psychiatry. Clinicians should understand when and why to screen for this disorder.

My interest in sleep is clinically selfish: Knowing a little about sleep makes me a better psychiatrist.

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Video

Psych Congress Steering Committee member Saundra Jain, MA, PsyD, LPC discusses the role of sleep in mental wellness, recommended sleep strategies, and increasing patient adherence.

Sleep expert Karl Doghramji, MD, and Psych Congress Steering Committee member Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH, discuss exciting developments in sleep medicine.

Karl Doghramji, MD, Professor at the Sleep Disorders Center at Jefferson University in Philadelpha, Pennsylvania, joins Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH, to talk about how clinicians can benefit from considering the mechanistic receptor profiles of interventions for sleep disorders. To read a transcript of the video conversation, click here

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